Stereo Imager (SSI)
 

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SSI is a high-heritage copy of the MPL SSI and of the imager for Mars Pathfinder [66], which returned nearly 17,000 images.  The original charge-coupled device (CCD) will be replaced with a higher resolution CCD of MER heritage.  SSI receives a command to take an image that moves the azimuth, elevation, and filter wheel motors. The CCD is exposed and the image data is transferred to the frame buffer board. The RS-422 high-speed serial interface is used to send the data to the lander computer.  SSI flight software, onboard the lander, processes the image and transfers it to the telemetry buffer for downlink.  SSI surveys the landing site for geological context, provides range maps in support of RA digging operations, and makes atmospheric dust and cloud measurements from its location 2 m above the ground. Two "eyes" allow stereoscopic imaging in blue, red, and near infrared. Filters allow imaging at 12 wavelengths of geologic interest and 8 of atmospheric interest.  Once the spacecraft has landed, the first product will be a panorama in full color with red stereo. The images will be compressed to make the panorama. Stereoscopic images of the digging area will be used to produce digital elevation models (DEMs); multispectral images will be used to identify local minerals.  Additional multispectral images around the site will be taken to fill available downlink. 

Sun images will be used to obtain opacity; sky  images will be used for aerosol and dust/cloudproperties. Lander images will used to assess SSI is a high-heritage copy of the MPL SSI and of the imager for Mars Pathfinder[66], which returned nearly 17,000 images. The original charge-coupled device (CCD) will be replaced with a higher resolution CCD of MER heritage. SSI receives a command to take an image that moves the azimuth, elevation, and filter wheel motors. The CCD is exposed and the image data is transferred to the frame buffer board. The RS-422 high-speed serial interface is used to send the data to the lander computer. SSI flight software, onboard the lander, processes the image and transfers it to the telemetry buffer for downlink.  SSI surveys the landing site for geological context, provides range maps in support of RA digging operations, and makes atmospheric dust and cloud measurements from its location 2 m above the ground. Two "eyes" allow stereoscopic imaging in blue, red, and near infrared. Filters allow imaging at 12 wavelengths of geologic interest and 8 of atmospheric interest.  Once the spacecraft has landed, the first product will be a panorama in full color with red stereo. The images will be compressed to make the panorama. Stereoscopic images of the digging area will be used to produce digital elevation models (DEMs); multispectral images will be used to identify local minerals.  Additional multispectral images around the site will be taken to fill available downlink.  Sun images will be used to obtain opacity; sky images will be used for aerosol and dust/cloud properties.

Lander images will  used to assess SSI is a high-heritage copy of the MPL SSI and of the imager for Mars Pathfinder [66], which returned nearly 17,000 images.  The original charge-coupled device (CCD) will be replaced with a higherresolution CCD of MER heritage. SSI receives a command to take an image that moves the azimuth, elevation, and filter wheel motors. The CCD is exposed and the image data is transferred to the frame buffer board. The RS-422 high-speed serial interface is used to send the data to the lander computer.  SSI flight software, onboard the lander, processes the image and transfers it to the telemetry buffer for downlink.  SSI surveys the landing site for geological context, provides range maps in support of RA digging operations, and makes atmospheric dust and cloud measurements from its location 2 m above the ground. Two "eyes" allow stereoscopic imaging in blue, red, and near infrared. Filters allow imaging at 12 wavelengths of geologic interest and 8 of atmospheric interest.  Once the spacecraft has landed, the first product will be a panorama in full color with red stereo. The images will be compressed to make the panorama. Stereoscopic images of the digging area will be used to produce digital elevation models (DEMs); multispectral images will be used to identify local minerals. Additional multispectral images around the site will be taken to fill available downlink.  Sun images will be used to obtain opacity; sky images will be used for aerosol and dust/cloud properties. Lander images will used to assess dust deposition rates.